gary@garynsmith.net
Mississippi
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How to Test AFCI and GFCI Receptacles

See AFCI and GFCI testing procedures below.

AFCI

An arc-fault circuit interrupter is a device intended to provide protection from the effects of arc faults by recognizing characteristics unique to arcing and by functioning to de-energize the circuit when an arc fault is detected. They should be tested monthly by the homeowner.

  1. Plug a nightlight (with an “ON/OFF” switch) or other product (such as a lamp or 3-bulb circuit tester) into the AFCI receptacle and turn the product “ON.”
  2. Push the “Test” button located on the AFCI receptacle. The nightlight (or other product) or circuit should go “OFF.”
  3. Push the “Reset” button. The light or circuit should go “ON” again.
  4. Circuit breaker type AFCI devices are checked by pushing the test button on the breaker. Modern AFCI receptacles and breakers have “self-testing” capabilities but they still should be tested manually per manufacturer’s instructions.

GFCI

Ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCI) can help prevent electrocution inside and outside the home. GFCIs are an effective means of protecting against electrical shock, however, they must be tested regularly — UL recommends once a month — to verify they are working properly.

  1. Plug a nightlight (with an “ON/OFF” switch) or other product (such as a lamp or 3-bulb circuit tester) into the GFCI receptacle and turn the product “ON.”
  2. Push the “Test” button located on the GFCI receptacle. The nightlight (or other product) or
    circuit should go “OFF.”
  3. Push the “Reset” button. The light or circuit should go “ON” again.
  4. Circuit breaker type GFCI devices are checked by pushing the test button on the breaker. Modern GFCI receptacles and breakers have “self-testing” capabilities but they still should be tested manually per manufacturer’s instructions.

With respect to NEW CONSTRUCTION currently all 120-volt, single phase, 15- and 20-ampere branch circuits supplying outlets installed in dwelling unit family rooms, dining rooms, kitchens, laundries, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms, sunrooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, or similar rooms or areas are required to be AFCI protected per current standards.

Mississippi does not have a statewide minimum building code. Each AHJ – Authority Having Jurisdiction – can adopt or omit specific code requirements. Our inspection is not a code compliance inspection.